Guest Post: What is Entrepreneurship by Yuliya Vanina

Thanks to the Coleman Entrepreneur Center at DePaul University, I had the pleasure of hosting Yuliya Vanina as a summer intern. Together, we streamlined, edited, marketed, designed, and brainstormed new ideas for my consulting business, making major progress in a number of areas. My business is a one person shop, so at the end of our time together, I was curious as to what Yuliya had taken away from this version of entrepreneurship. Here are her thoughts:

Entrepreneurship - What Is It? - Yuliya Vanina

I recently heard someone call entrepreneurship, “sexy.” I mean when you look at the positives, who wouldn’t?

  • You create your own schedule

  • You are your own boss

  • You make the rules

  • No one can fire you!

That does sound nice, who wouldn’t want that?

Though what I learned about entrepreneurship has shown to be quite the opposite.

  • Your job is basically your life

  • Weekends. What are those?

  • You live for the opportunity

  • You make incredible sacrifices

  • You stay positive even through the most difficult moments in life

Despite these characteristics, entrepreneurship comes down to 3 things in my humble opinion. Despite popular belief, I don’t think just anyone can be an entrepreneur. I think it takes a special kind of person, someone who has all the above and the following, a passion, a real work ethic, and ability to make sacrifices.  It sound like a description for any job out there but let me explain.

Passion

In entrepreneurship this is probably the leading characteristic. Entrepreneurs cry over the love they have for what they do, they live it and breathe it, and I believe that this passion needs to be so strong that it over rules everything else in order to fuel a leading business.

Work Ethic

This isn’t a 9 to 5. This is a 9 to whenever you are done, and maybe even an all-nighter. Despite the fact that most entrepreneurs are awful at time management, they are persistent and determined. They first have the passion and secondly a deep rooted desire to get shit done, that in return fuels their work.

Sacrifices

The first two are important, but this last one is necessary. To be an entrepreneur you have to make sacrifices, both financially and personally. Your love life will suffer, and so will your wallet, but it is all for a greater good. The hardest part is managing it all. I honestly think starting entrepreneurs have more grey hairs than CEO’s, but whose counting, right?

I think it’s a hard job being an entrepreneur; it is both challenging and fulfilling. When you see what you have created with your own hands that is one of the few most rewarding feelings in life. It isn’t sexy, but it sure is rewarding. 

Introducing Good Steps: Curated Entrepreneur and Impact Resources

Entrepreneurship is hard, but staying connected to people and resources can help anyone advancing their project overcome obstacles. As the leader of Coffee & Conversation and through many coffees, meetings, and events I have seen people ask the same questions over and over again about the self-starting process. There are many great places out there to get help and answers, but I didn't one place that collected everything...or at least as much as possible. 

My friend Molly Black and I approached that challenge as an opportunity, and as a result I am proud to present Good Steps: A curated collection of tools and resources for the impact community in Chicago and beyond. 

Careers in Focus: Gaming - Chicago Public Library

Careers in Focus: Gaming

On Saturday, February 6, I joined the Chicago Public Library's awesome YouMedia space along with many other gaming professionals from the Chicagoland area for a day focus teens interested in careers in gaming. I got to play my game Insight with a lot of motivated and curious youth and talk about their interest in games. We used Insight to look at their own skills and interests and discuss the many ways they might use them to pursue a career that makes the most of both. 

I also participated on a panel of people who all work with games in different ways; some as storytellers, some video game designers, but all of whom shed light on games being much more than just "fun". They are fun! However, I know they would all agree with my statement, that games can "solve anything".

https://chipublib.bibliocommons.com/events/5674894cb95eb7075d002dd6

24834219486_ab6e048ddb_o.jpg

How do you decide what to work on? Podcast with Idea Lemon

Idea Lemon is my two friends' company that helps people discover their inner awesome. I had the pleasure of joining them recently for an episode of their podcast series, and you can now catch the results here!

http://www.idealemon.com/podcast/2016/1/5/s3-i-e8-how-do-you-pick-an-interest-levi-baer

We had a pretty candid talk about the good problem of having too many interests to follow, and how that creates a confusing situation of not being sure what to work on next, or even where to build your career.

I always leave my talks with them feeling one step farther along with whatever I'm working on, so check out the episode if any of that sounds familiar for you!

Tips for Surviving Unemployment

This post was originally published March 24, 2014.

Three weeks ago I was laid of from my job as a program manager at a small nonprofit.  Coming as a pretty big surprise, I did what most people would do in that situation and begin to freak out about those pesky concepts of paying bills and eating food.  Darn, why do they have to cost money?! 

Spoiler alert: I’ll cut right to the end of this story.  Today I start a new job and I have had a delightful and productive three weeks of networking, intentional socializing, and of course, sleeping in.  My first week of unemployment was fairly stressful, as I thought about money and my future.  However, at the end of the first week, I realized that I had been given the thing I have been wanting for months now…time.  I had all day every day to do whatever I wanted, and rather than spend it worrying I realized I should be putting it to good use. 

That mind shift from stress to productivity resulted in a great couple weeks off and ultimately lead to the acquisition of my new employment.  Looking back on the whole experience, I believe there are a few takeaways worth sharing. Thus, I present Levi Baer’s top 4 tips for surviving unemployment:

1. Don’t Panic

I know this is easier said than done for some people (shout out to my Myers-Briggs “P” types), but really, just relax.  Take stock of your situation and assets, I bet you have more going for you than you realize because you haven’t been forced to assess or use your full set of resources if you’ve been in the same routine for a while.  Focus on the future and what is possible, not on the past and what went wrong.  Sleep in, make some bacon pancakes or other favorite breakfast, and look towards what’s next.  I was able to double check my bank account, apply for unemployment aide, breathe a sigh of relief, and move on. 

2. Make the Most of the Situation

Time is arguably the most important resource each of us have.  It’s limited and we’re all given the same amount each day. Use it effectively!  It might be nice to spend the first day or two finally watching all the episodes of Freaks and Geeks, but after that get up and do the things you’ve been wanting to do but have been putting off.  Meet up with old friends, paint your room, take a community class, explore the city.  The list can go on and on of things you can do while your'e also applying for new jobs.  I spent a lot of my unemployed time at coffee shops, connecting with friends and collaborators. 

3.Trust Your Network

This is the big one.  Reach out to people you know, embrace the vulnerability of asking for help, and connect to the opportunities that are surely happening throughout your network.  Without asking, you’ll never know everything that other people, even your close friends, are doing for work, hobby, and play, and what those activities could mean for you.  Finding new employment is almost always easier through referrals rather than cold calls.  If you’re okay with any sort of job, you will probably be surprised by how fast you can get one through your network.  If now is the time for a career or location change, don’t just Google your dream city, ask people what they know about it or if they know anyone there who can give you recommendations for jobs and housing.  Really, talk to as many people as you can.  I sent out an email to 80 people outlining what skills I had to offer and where I thought they could be best applied.  A week later I was interviewing with a friend of a friend who received that email.  

4. Continue to Build Your Network

Ask your network for help, but don’t stop there.  Stay actively engaged with those connections and find out how you can give back to those around you.  Not only will you likely feel good about doing so, you’ll probably end up opening more doors for yourself.  You probably have a friend in the middle of a project that could use some extra brain or muscle power.  There’s likely someone running a volunteer program that needs a person with your skill set.  Take time to learn more about what the people you know are doing both professionally and for hobby.  All of these interactions hold not only the potential for your next job, but also can create fun and engaging opportunities you didn’t know were possible.  Not to mention, you can continue to strengthen your network for the next time it’s needed. 

I enjoyed my time out of the rat race so much that I wish it was lasting longer.  Perhaps one downside of this type of heavy engagement with your network, is that learning about a lot of good opportunities all at once might make you feel like some are too good to pass up.  I am glad to be getting back to work though and all the networking will just have to fit into nights and weekends, not stop altogether.  At least the bacon pancakes don’t have to end anytime soon either.

Bees, Butterflies, and Plants in Organizations

Time for that age old talk about the birds and the bees.  Oh wait!  I’ll leave that awkward moment for you and a parent, in the mean time I’m going to tell you about the bees, butterflies, and plants, in the context of organizations.  This piece will help you recognize which one you are at your workplace, and what benefit each of those brings to the situation (no, not cool wings or stingers).

I first heard about this model from a friend of mine when he returned from a conference where participants were directed to act as either bees or butterflies.  I was fascinated, but felt the framework fell a little short of covering most of the important options, so I’ve expanded it to include plants.  Without further ado, a description of each:

Bees

Bees are the pollinators of an organizations!  They are the ones that are constantly collecting information and resources from one place and bringing it to another.  You will find them spreading best practices between departments, passing on news of the organization, or even exchanging juicy stories at the water cooler.  This role is important because the bees will use both formal and informal communication channels to keep an organization internally connected and connected to the outside world.  Organizations can benefit from recognizing those with this skill and utilizing it for the company’s benefit, rather than hamper it.

Butterflies

Those who take on the butterfly role are collectors of information, but are not necessarily in the habit of spreading it throughout the organization.  They are often great listeners and note takers during meetings and although it may not seem like they are participating they are actually filling an important role.  Organizations can benefit greatly from those who collect and retain knowledge and resources.  If their knowledge is correctly recorded, it can lead to institutional knowledge that endures through turnover and change.  Unlike their bee counterparts who are also collectors, the butterflies may do a more thorough job of gathering knowledge because they are less concerned with moving on to share it.  Companies should embrace those who fill this role and create proper outlets for tapping into the butterfly’s wealth of knowledge.

Plants

Plants are the people from whom the other two types collect information, gossip, and best practices.  They may be content experts with a unique set of skills or knowledge about a field.  They may also be people who have been at an organization a long time and may have transitioned from a butterfly role to a plant role, perhaps because they felt they no longer needed to collect.  Plants play an extremely important role in organizational dynamics and organizations should allow them to take root, so to speak.  As with the butterflies, plants should be allowed to hold on to information, but engaged in ways that respect their more reserved communication style.  

As with almost every model for classifying people into types, everyone in this framework is important.  We need those who know the valuable methods and tips just as much as we need those who spread the nectar of knowledge throughout a company.  In closing, consider the questions below and how you see this framework at work at your job:

What role do you think you fill at work?

Does your organization support your role?

Does your organization support all three of the roles?

Did I miss any roles?  What would you add?

MBTI: Thinkers and Feelers During Conflict

Have you ever been so frustrated with someone that you don’t even know how to express what’s going on in your head?  I think a lot of us have experienced these types of situations that either lead to hurtful comments or unresolved confrontations.  When it comes to conflict resolution, it can often be worthwhile to find external tools or to help us frame our thoughts and our view of others.  The Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator is just that, a tool for effective communication, especially during conflict. Learning about your personality type isn’t just a cool parlor trick or conversation starter.  Once you’re conversant in the terms and concepts, you can use constructive language to resolve disputes and differences, rather than suffer through frustrating arguments.

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator provides four aspects of personality, each with a continuum between two different preferences.  Where we land on the continue of each preference pair can be used to describe how we communicate with others. One of the most important personality distinctions during conflict is that of Thinkers and Feelers; basically, whether we prefer logic or emotion during decision making.

Three things Thinkers and Feelers can do during conflict resolution.

Thinking - Primarily use logic based decision making

  1. Empathy - Take a moment to try and understand what others are experiencing from their point of view.  To others, “it feels right” might be more important than “it makes sense”.

  2. Give Praise - Thinking types have a tendency to point out what’s wrong rather than what’s right.  This often won’t well with Feelers, who are doing the exact opposite.  Be sure to mix in some good with the bad.

  3. People are important - Yes, T’s think that people are important, but they have a tendency to view them as a line item along with other important items.  Instead, consider that others view people as the most important factor in any conflict equation.

Feeling - Primarily use emotion based decision making

  1. Stay engaged - At times, those with a Feeling preference will avoid conflict resolution because it can be uncomfortable to address differences, however, some issues need to be resolved.  Work towards a resolution by acknowledging differences and suggesting compromises, and hopefully the other person is open to that sort of respectful communication.

  2. Use an objective viewpoint - Feelers have a tendency to make themselves the object of the criticism of others, when in fact the disagreement may stem from situational or environmental factors. Make sure it is about you before taking it personally.

  3. Analyze - It can be difficult for feelers to make critical decisions when more than one option feels right, which can be frustrating for others.  Find decision making tools that can help quantify different options, or seek input some someone you trust who has an analytical mind.

As usual when talking about personality type, the most important takeaway here is that both Thinkers and Feelers are important and provide valuable input during disagreements.  You wouldn't want a situation with purely logical decisions without considering the emotional consequences, nor would you want the opposite, a situation with only empathy and no critical analysis.  Especially in business where both profits and people are of utmost importance, it's good to recognize the benefits of each and bring together the best of both types.

Transformational Leadership

Great leaders are born not made, right?  I think someone said that at some point.  Sure, there are genetic traits we are born with, such as how gregarious a person is, and some of those traits might be more or less beneficial in leadership situation.  That's what personality assessments like the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator serve to illustrate.  However, there is also consistent research that shows that there are leadership qualities that can be learned and practiced to create highly effective leaders.  

Transformational Leadership provides a great model for examining effectively leadership that not only inspires great work from a group, but also fosters mutual respect and satisfaction between leadership and followers.  It serves as a proactive alternative to traditional management styles that are reactive and fix problems only after they occur, or even worse inactive that never fixes anything.  When employed correctly and consistently, transformational leadership heads off issues before they become problems.

There are four main aspects of transformational leadership:

Inspirational Motivation

A leader who practices inspirational motivation is one who provides an appealing vision that brings the group out of their comfort zone and into high productivity.  This is done with a sense of optimism and inclusion that makes everyone feel like they are a team, together on a path to greatness.  

As an example, the manager of a online store might display inspirational motivation by clearly describing to the team their sales goals as a company and how important each of their roles are in accomplishing that goal.  Although tangible rewards like bonuses can be helpful, the manager could also leverage intangible rewards as motivator, such as the challenge of becoming the highest selling store in their market.

Individual Consideration

Leaders who use individual consideration take on a mentor role with their group.  They use an empathetic approach to providing support to each and every person they're guiding to help provide a sense of purpose.  This also involves recognizing the contributions that each individual provides to the group, which can be done through personality assessment, strength & skills inventories, and recognizing individual aspirations.

As an example of individual consideration in the workplace, a manager would make one-on-one time with their employees a priority.  Setting and sticking to an open door policy can help employees feel like they can always find a welcome ear with their manager.  Additionally, the company can invest in tools that help the team learn about each others’ strengths and then build roles and projects that tailor to those strengths.

Idealized Influence

A leader who practices idealized influence serves as a role model for their team.  They not only talk the talk, but also walk the walk, embodying the values of the group and organization.  They typically go about their work enthusiastically and with optimism.  They would not ask anything from the group that they will not adhere to as well.  

For this example, consider a group with an informal leader; a team of architects working on a project that has a senior staff person who the others look to for advice.  If this admired team member asks the group to be 10 minutes early every day so they’re ready to go at 9:00am, they will be sure to stick to that rule.  The credibility they have built is reinforced when they stick to their word and participate in reaching group goals.

Intellectual Stimulation

Leaders can carry out intellectual stimulation by facilitating innovation and creativity for a group.  They provide opportunities for people to challenge themselves and make the most of their talents.  These leaders not only bring new ideas, but inspire others to be creative and push conventional boundaries.  

One way a manager could practice intellectual stimulation is by hosting innovation workshops, where staff from every level of the organization comes together to brainstorm and discuss new ways of approaching the internal processes of the organization as well as the external messages they send to the public.  This would foster an environment where new ideas and change is welcomed, rather than shunned, which can keep an organization healthy and a step ahead of their competitors.

Transformational leadership is a concept for anyone at any level of an organization.  Employees should always consider how their actions affect and influence those around them.  It can take practice, but imagine the difference it would make if we were all carrying out these four concepts to their fullest extent every day.  Whether we were born leaders or not, let’s make a happy and productive workplace start with us!

The Abilene Paradox: Saying 'Yes' When No One Wants To

Have you ever gone out for food with a group, fought over where you would eat, then once you're there nobody is happy with the final decision? We've probably all been in these situations and they don't make sense! Why would a group of people ever go forward with plan that no one in the group thought was a good idea? The answer: The Abilene Paradox.

This communication theory, named after a city in Texas, describes odd phenomenon as a breakdown of communication when of a group of people decides upon a course of action that many or all of the group members are actually against. But why?! It sounds nuts, yet it happens.  The answer lies hidden in the perplexing power of social pressure. The Abilene Paradox exists because everyone in a group is be too worried about being viewed as a dissenting and minority opinion in the group. More simply put, nobody wants to rock the boat.  

The follies of the group dining decision is just one of many examples of how this paradox can leave everyone unsatisfied, frustrated, or even in financial or legal trouble. Arguably the worst, and most public example in U.S. history of The Abilene Paradox wreaking havoc is considered to be the Watergate Scandal in the 1970s. Research after the event has revealed that many of the people involved were not comfortable with the cover-up, but no one objected because they wanted to be seen as a team player.  In hindsight, I’m sure some of them wish they had spoken up.

We can see the Abilene Paradox at work in the workplace as well. For example a board of executives grasping for new revenue generators can decide to invest in a new project in which no one feels confident. Additionally, an office might throw a holiday party because it's viewed as something they're supposed to do even though no one there actually wants the party. On a smaller scale, we have probably all been in meetings that end with action items that don't seemed to be tied to any real objectives. And of course meetings just for the sake of meetings are a common culprit and time waster.  

Here's the good news: there are many ways to avoid the Abilene Paradox.  It can be as simple as a group taking the time to check in at the end of a discussion and ask if everyone is satisfied with the outcome.  However, at times that is easier said than done, due to tensions in the room or simply that some people aren’t as comfortable voicing their opinion in front of a crowd.  The graphic below shows three ways to help reduce the occurrence of this paradox, known as Teach, Talk, & Watch.

Make your voice heard. Be the type of person that says "hey, maybe staff meetings at 4:30pm on Friday aren't the best idea" or "singing the birthday song doesn't have to be mandatory."  It's likely you'll end up being somewhat of a hero with more people in agreement than originally let on.  

Responding to the "Can I Pick Your Brain?" Question

“Can I pick your brain?”

This question gets thrown around all the time, but for the person being asked it can be a gift and a curse. On one hand, it’s an honor to be sought out for your ideas and experience. It feels good both personally and professionally when people come to me for insight and advice, especially in an industry like mine (business consulting) where my thoughts are my commodity.

However, the fact that thoughts ARE my commodity is what lies at the root of any tension surrounding this seemingly harmless question. My business offers team building consulting and being asked for my favorite ice breakers or ways to foster innovation are exactly what I want people and organizations to buy from me.

Imagine asking a lawyer for free legal advice. Normally you wouldn’t, because we are all used to paying for their time and more importantly for their thoughts. But why? The answer is complicated, but one reason is that we understand the value behind their time. It’s the same reason you pay the Geek Squad to repair your computer rather than your nerdy, 14 year old nephew, because you find more value in the Geek Squad’s work.

I asked my friend Scott Kane about this concept. He runs Kane Community Law, which provides excellent legal counsel to small businesses in Chicago; this is what he had to say:

Find Scott's insightful thoughts and my favorite responses to the "Can I Pick Your Brain?" question over on the Mac & Cheese Productions blog: 

http://macncheeseproductions.com/guest-post-responding-to-the-can-i-pick-your-brain-question/

Sharing some of my brain with my friends  Idea lemon . Photo by  Sara Faraj .

Sharing some of my brain with my friends Idea lemon. Photo by Sara Faraj.

Tempered Radicals: Rocking the Boat

Feeling confined and restricted at work isn’t just a problem for millennials who typically seek greater flexibility than other sectors of the workforce. Everyone can be adversely affected by an abundance of unnecessary rules and over the top hierarchy. Some structure is good, of course; properly defined and communicated organizational guidelines can give all levels of staff the framework for appropriate behavior.

What about when the rules feel a little too constricting? There are moments when people feel like policies and procedures not only hamper individuality and expression, but ultimately stunt creativity, happiness, and productivity. If a person spends a significant portion of the day mumbling under their breath due to frustration towards a rule regarding food storage in the break room fridge, they’re probably not getting as much work done as they could. It’s even possible some of that lost work time is spent browsing job postings while dreaming of an office with no fridge restrictions.

Usually though, it takes too much effort to chase after grass-is-greener job opportunities and people tend to stick around while finding ways to push back against confining rules and cultural norms. When this sort of resistance is done with enough subtlety to not incur any major backlash it is called being a tempered radical. Being a tempered radical means rocking the boat enough to make waves, but not enough to tip the boat over. In the workplace, it gives employees a way to express their individuality, and to some degree, a means of protest. For example, if an office had a policy banning traditional ethnic clothing, an employee may act as a tempered radical by wearing just a scarf or headband that technically breaks the rule, but doesn’t draw enough attention to warrant punishment.

When carried out appropriately, acting as a tempered radical has its benefits:

  • It allows employees to feel like they are autonomous and have free will in the workplace, which leads to satisfaction and retention.

  • It usually doesn’t cause enough disruption to negatively affect the productivity of the workplace. If the action isn’t seen as an issue, there is no time wasted on meetings, discipline, and new policies.

  • It can create community among staff who share in an action or issue.

  • Most importantly, it can lead to long term changes in the workplace. As organizations become increasingly used to a number of small deviances from the norm, policies and cultural practices will likely be adjusted to accommodate the behavior. Big changes can occur over time from small steps!

Rather than create some made up examples for this post, I polled my social network for ways they have been tempered radicals in a work environment. I received a slew of responses from millennials, baby-boomers, and those in between. You will see that sometimes a tempered radical will act for their own personal health and well-being, while other times it actually creates positive and productive change in the workplace.

Wearing a unique ear piercing at a large and traditional company.

Breaking a culture of silent acceptance by posing questions to management about organizational decisions that affect staff.

Altering the company dress code by advocating against business casual.

Changing the culture of meetings by being early, standing, checking email at appropriate times, requesting agendas, and advocating for fewer meetings comprised of only the necessary attendees.

Pushing the boundaries of meeting procedures by eating during meetings and breaking hierarchy by sitting at the table with senior staff.

Addressing physicians by their first name.

Promoting calm environments by hosting tea parties.

Countering traditional business appearance through casual clothes, an alternative hairstyle, and tattoos.

Wearing a unique hair color to a professional conference.

Keeping a nontraditional hairstyle among a group of more traditional employees.

Addressing board members by first name.

Jump starting an ongoing staff potluck event in an office typically lacking in socialization.

Promoting work/life balance by requesting and receiving sabbaticals and remote work arrangements.

Wearing bright colors in a space where grey, blue, and black are the norm.

What is Gamification?

Simply put, gamification is when game elements and game design techniques are put to use in non-game scenarios and contexts.  Although the term gamification is relatively new, most of us are probably more familiar with the concept than we realize.  Take the social networking check-in app Foursquare for example, that’s a gamified system.  Consider reward points at your local grocery store or gas station, that’s gamification too.  We most often see gamification through the use of PBLs, or points, badges, and leaderboards.  However, according to Kevin Werbach, a professor of business ethics at The University of Pennsylvania who teaches a class on gamification and provided the definition I gave above, there is a lot more to the concept than only PBLs.

Gamification delves into matters of motivation, psychology, and economics.  It’s not limited to any one field of study and instead sets out to answer the multi-faceted and complex question of why do humans behave in certain ways.

When considered as an important tool for motivation, the applications of gamification are many and fall into three main categories:

External - Companies use game elements for marketing, sales, and customer engagement to boost sales and market presence.  

Internal - Within organizations, gamification is used for productivity boosts, garnering employee feedback, and other human resources related functions.

Behavior Change:  Utilized in individual or group applications, gamification is a powerful tool for health & wellness motivation, sustainability, or even personal finance.

Professor Werbach points out a few other key points of gamification in the online class he teaches on the subject.  First, there must be alignment between the outcomes in the implemented game and the goals of the organization.  For example, a game system applied to a call center would be more effective when points are earned for high customer satisfaction ratings rather than speed of the resolution of calls.  Points awarded to fast calls may actually leave customers unhappy.  

Next, participation must be mandatory.  If someone is forced to “play” against their will, all of a sudden that person is no longer playing but is once again at work.  One of the reasons why gamification can be so successful is because often participants will leave behind the feeling of doing work, but this can only be achieved if they are participating on their own will.  Additionally, gamification should instill some learning or problem solving.  For example, if a marketing campaign has users scratch off tickets to win, but they continually win every time they play, there is no problem present, the system stops being fun and engaging, and people will quit participating.  Think of the McDonalds’ monopoly game; one of the main reasons it’s fun is due to the good chance of not winning and it taking continued engagement to work towards the bigger prizes.  

As a professional, gamification combines my passion for training and development with my life long love of board games.  At their simplest, games are a great way to bring together and spend social, face to face time with other people.  When implemented at the organizational level, games can break new ground not only in personnel participation, but also sustained improvement over time.  Every application is unique and presents its own opportunity to overcome challenges and create never before thought of solutions.

What examples of games and gamification have you experienced in your workplace?

Contact me and let's talk about implementing gamification at your workplace.